The Institute of Parallel Science
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The Science Behind it all

“One of the many implications of recent cosmological observations is that the concept of parallel universes is no mere metaphor. Space appears to be infinite in size. If so, then somewhere out there, everything that is possible becomes real, no matter how improbable it is.”

Max Tegmark, astrophysicist


But not only is everything possible. YOU define how the future of the universe that you are in develops, because your every action changes your entire universe.

Illustrated through the light-cones (above), all the many possible actions that you perform, over time, collapse into a single event. This is your current now. Above the now there are endless possibilities and through your life, your choices define which path you take through these possibilities.


Every time such an event occurs, the universe splits and you stay in one universe, while your double stays in the other, having made whatever choice led there.

Thus, there are an infinite number of you, in an infinite number of universes. Each one is slightly or massively different. In some universes you might be dead, or might never have been born. In some universes intelligent dinosaurs may roam the earth, having never been extinct, there may be no humans or modern civilization may have it’s economic centres in central africa, while the western world is a starving, underdeveloped, region.

Anything you could possibly imagine is not only possible, but actually exists out there in the multiverse.


We, at The Institute of Parallel Science will take you there.

The Institute of Parallel Science, c/o Jens Bäckvall, Perlestikkervej 17, 5.tv., 2400 Copenhagen NV, DENMARK

tlf.: (+45) 25 48 64 84, e-mail: jensbackvall@t-nova.org

If you would like to know more about Parallel universes, we recommend the following:


The home page of physicist Max Tegmark: http://space.mit.edu/home/tegmark/


There are lots of books on the subject, but these three are easy to understand and read:


“In Search of the Multiverse” by John Gribbin

“The Universe Next Door” by Marcus Chown

“Parallell Worlds” by Michio Kaku